Further Expanding Digital Humanities Communities of Practice

The Digital Humanities Research Institute (DHRI) is an intensive, community-oriented, and foundational approach to learning technical skills in service of humanities teaching and learning.

Graphic that depicts: Digital Humanities Research Institute logotype

Further Expanding Digital Humanities Communities of Practice

The Digital Humanities Research Institute (DHRI) is an intensive, community-oriented, and foundational approach to learning technical skills in service of humanities teaching and learning.

Exciting News

The Graduate Center was awarded a $250,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to support an expanded version of the Digital Humanities Research Institute, a 10-day residential workshop, first held in June 2018, that brought together humanities faculty, administrators, and curators. In the following year, participants returned to their own campus or organization and led local institutes based on the GC's model. Through this train-the-trainer approach, the first DHRI award reached more than 250 additional participants.

The new project, The Digital Humanities Research Institutes (DHRI): Further Expanding Digital Humanities Communities of Practice, will extend the workshop and training to a new cohort of 15 participants in June 2020. Upon completion, DHRI’s network will include more than 30 community leaders of grassroots digital humanities research institutes at universities, libraries, archives, museums, and scholarly organizations across the United States.

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The application period for attending the 2020 Digital Humanities Research Institute will open in late 2019. If you would like us to send you a reminder when the application period has begun, with more information about requirements, etc. please fill out this form:

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About DHRI

Through seminar-style discussions with leading scholars in digital humanities, hands-on workshops on core technical competencies, and project development labs, participants will become familiar with working from the command line, collaborating with git, programming with Python, querying structured data, creating maps, and analyzing texts computationally. You will also become part of a growing network of institute leaders by developing your own DHRI based on our open, core curriculum to be led at your home institution or organization.

In June 2018, GC Digital Initiatives hosted sixteen faculty, librarians, museum administrators, and staff at The Graduate Center, CUNY, for a ten-day, in-person institute. Funded through an NEH Institutes in Advanced Topics in Digital Humanities award, the Digital Humanities Research Institute (DHRI) provided professional development training that combined a pedagogical approach and core set of curricular materials. Participants organized local versions of DHRI using our core curriculum or creating their own lessons, reflecting their communities' interests and needs. Applicants to the program were asked to provide letters of support from their home institution committing to the local event, and GC Digital Initiatives committed to providing 20 hours of individual support to participants throughout the academic year.


DHRI Principles

When the first DHRI cohort returned to The Graduate Center in June 2019, they shared reflections about how their experience as part of the project impacted their professional development and future career goals. DHRI's ambition was to help humanities practitioners tasked with "building DH community" in their local organizations emerge as leaders. The feedback we received overwhelmingly demonstrated that every member of the cohort felt that their participation in the project helped to establish or strengthen their leadership role in DH locally. More significantly, the cohort reported feeling that their participation in the network of DHRI organizations was also an opportunity for leadership. As a collective, we agreed that a title change from "participant" to "Community Leader" better reflected the role that they wished to play in expanding DH communities of practice. Additionally, the cohort described that the experience improved their confidence as learners, teachers, researchers, and leaders, because they understood what it meant to know enough without needing to know everything. Many attendees reported an increase in title or recognition, additional funding, and greater clout among colleagues and administrators. Additional professional development outcomes noted by the cohort included: new pedagogical strategies to integrate into their teaching, new ideas about graduate education and open access to share with their local institution, and an increased ability to locate and leverage alternative resources locally.

DHRI's pedagogical approach combines inclusive and critical pedagogy with a flexible set of workshops in foundational technical concepts, foregrounding humanities skepticism and inquiry in form and content. Through hands-on workshops that model peer-to-peer learning communities in the humanities, DHRI is designed to value and further develop local expertise rather than reproduce the myth that digital humanities training is best when it happens at "centers of expertise."

We believe that transformative and sustainable learning is most possible when it is community-based. Our workshops begin by introducing each participant as a domain expert with valuable experience to contribute to the learning community. The approach is centered on celebrating the unique domains of knowledge that each participant and each institutional setting offers. Through explicit attention to inclusive language, instruction, and discussion, we encourage instructors to implement a similar pedagogical approach in their local institutes. Our community-based approach has scaled well: the first cohort of NEH participants has become local institute leaders who in turn have fostered local communities of DH practice.

Our curriculum focuses on technical skills and concepts upon which additional technologies and tools rely. Approximately one-third of all sessions at the Institute could be described as foundational: they introduce the command line, version control & data collaboration, data & databases, and Python using flexible, open source technologies that are accessible to the widest possible audience. Our emphasis on fundamental skills demonstrates our commitment to cultivating resilience that empower humanities researchers to become self-teachers and mentors in their own right. While intensive lessons prioritize instrumental outcomes, such as whether students can write for a loop or build a map, our focus is on a longer arc of professional development. While immediate results help pique interest and help scholars see the potential for digital research methods in their own work, confidence in core computational skills and concepts help to develop resilience that lasts beyond a single project or tool's lifespan. Better prepared to approach technology (and technological rhetoric) with a critical eye, scholars comfortable with core computational literacy and a common technical vocabulary are more likely to participate in local communities of practice.

Read more about the DHRI curriculum, including the following workshops offered at the June 2018 DHRI hosted by GC Digital Initiatives at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

 Command Line  Git and GitHub  Python  Databases  Text Analysis  HTML/CSS  Machine Learning  Mapping  Ethics  Twitter API  Project Lab

The cohort consistently reported that the most significant value came from the connections they made at the June 2018 meeting in New York, and the network of support that has developed since. Exit interviews in June 2018 demonstrate a significant change from the anxieties reported by the same cohort a year earlier. Before attending DHRI, many reported they felt isolated, saying, "I'm the only one doing this on my campus," and they felt anxious about whether or not there would be interest or if they could find collaborators. However, intergroup connections among the DHRI Network Community Leaders and with the CUNY Graduate Center fellows and staff resulted in a completely different response in 2019. Combined with the support pledged by their local organizations and the prestige of attending an NEH-funded institute, Community Leaders felt confident making connections within and outside their home institutions. For example, the South Bend DHRI combined efforts from St. Mary's College and the University of Notre Dame, which led to applications for additional funding through the Indiana State Humanities Council and matching funds from their institutions. Those funds allowed them to hire graduate students from nearby Loyola University of Chicago and University of Illinois at Chicago. Those whose institutions were unable to provide additional funding or local collaborators could turn to their DHRI Network partners for encouragement, advice, and help.

Current DHRI Network

ME.Digital Humanities Institute Maine community collegeonline
ME.Digital Humanities Institute Maine
community college online
The ME.Digital Humanities Institute was offered as a free, seven-week, online workshop with the intention of creating a collaborative space for humanities professionals across Maine, who would work with one another while developing digital projects.

Institute Summary
Dates

Jan 22-Mar 8, 2019

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Community Leader

Dianne Fallon

Dr. Dianne Fallon is the English Department Chair at York County Community College. Currently, she is involved with integrating more digital tools into English and Humanities classes, both to stimulate interest in humanities subjects and to boost student confidence in using digital technologies. At York County Community College, Dianne teaches a variety of writing courses, including College Composition, Creative Writing and Creative Non-Fiction, as well as Humanities courses such as Multicultural America. In spring 2019, she will teach a new course, "Witches and War, on the Web", in which students will investigate the connection between the Salem Witch trials and Abenaki-colonial warfare in Maine, and will develop their own local history research and digital presentation projects.
Transcript

My Institute was called the Maine Digital Humanities Institute which I offered as an online institute over seven weeks using the platform Slack. I did this because I'm basically a one-woman show. I work in a community college that is very thinly staffed—lots of part-time faculty, people wearing many, many hats. And it's a very energetic place where people like to take on initiatives but because everybody's taking on all these initiatives, they have to pick and choose and so I was kind of on my own.

I knew that I could do the online piece on my own because I have 20 years experience teaching online and I had become familiar with Slack through a couple of graduate courses I'd taken. I also knew that the time when I was offering my Institute—January to March—I had a pretty good chance of getting participation and interest because, let's face it: that's a really good time to sit on a couch in Maine! I recruited participants for my Institute through a variety of means at my own institution and also using a listserv and building upon connections that I'd made through a previous NEH grant I had had to help develop the local capacity for public history in my area: York County Maine. I also presented cards for the Institute at a presentation I gave at a local state-wide conference of museums and I was able to get eleven participants from a variety of backgrounds including some faculty and staff at my institution, a lot of people from the museum community and what I think is somewhat unique to folks who were living and working on offshore islands in Maine.

So we started out with some general exchange of information about what we were doing and projects that we were interested in and also kind of looking at some of the easy-to-use, out-of-the-box tools, some of which might be proprietary, and then we moved into some of the CUNY lessons, starting with the command line. I knew that, from my experience in teaching online, I knew that it would, to sustain the engagement in the course, it would be really important to stay connected with people and to have people develop a sense of connection with each other.

In Maine—it's a very large state geographically but it's a small state professionally and people like to forge connections and so there was a very collegial air from from the beginning. One thing I like about Slack is that it has an alert mechanism that quickly, on my phone, I could tell if somebody had a question so I could get back to them right away.

Since I was kind of a neophyte leading even people who were ultra-neophytes I didn't always have the answer to their question but I knew that if I just get back to them, like: "I'm going to answer your question, we're going to find the answer," that was going to kind of keep them engaged.

It was very intensive seven weeks with that everyday, a few times a day there'd be that alert on the phone and there's a lot of back and forth with the CUNY message board to try to solve some little technical glitches or little places in the curriculum where it might not be quite clear if you were only relying on the written word to complete the tutorial as opposed to a classroom environment where an instructor can fill in some of the gaps.

But by the end of the seven weeks, five people completed the Institute, which is about what I expected. I went in hoping that half of the folks would complete. And even for those who didn't complete, for example, there was someone who's a key person at the Maine State Library in some of their digital initiatives, she wasn't able to complete the course but she knew kind of what it was about, it's kind of "tucked in her backpocket," you know, as Maine moves forward. The completers is not a statistically significant sample. But they were a mix of what I would call the "youngins" and the baby-boomers. I will say the youngins took more readily to the tutorials but everyone... You know, the baby boomers stuck with it and it was kind of interesting because I think the older folks, we had come of age with DOS and the the precursor to Windows so we knew that there was something behind the screen. We just didn't want to go there because it looked really complicated, whereas some of the younger participants, they were "the native GUI people" and so they didn't even know that there was something behind the screen in some cases. So, you know, it was fun for them to sort of dig in and see, you know... use the command line, work a little bit with the QGIS and the HTML, the CSS and that sort of thing.

The general outcome I think was similar to the way I felt at the end of the CUNY Institute which was: "Well, this is interesting; this is cool. What am I gonna do with this now? Will I use this?" And I think that after about a year plus of working with these tools, and still not using them on a regular basis, I now have a better sense of how I would use them and why. For example, I'm working on a project where I'm collecting data on immigrants that were required to register with the state of Maine on the eve of World War II, and I know that I can use certain tools in the command line to clear up that data, to manipulate it, and so forth... My participants in my Institute may not be at that place yet but I think that one thing they learned is that this is not rocket science. The process demystified some of the technical challenges, and that the command line isn't some foreign language that they can't possibly understand. And I think just getting that understanding is valuable and helps to carry people forward in their work in digital humanities.

Binghamton DHRI New York public R1
Binghamton DHRI New York
public R1
The Binghamton Digital Humanities Research Institute was offered as a 4-day intensive workshop for university faculty and graduate students who are interested in the digital humanities. The institute included seminar-type sessions oriented around critical discussion and hands-on workshops that introduced the foundational skills and tools that are central to digital humanities practices. Sessions treated topics such as the command line, data visualization, digital mapping, Python, text analysis, platforms for the digital presentation of research, open access and ethics. The goal for the Institute was to foster a dynamic, robust and generative community of digital humanities researchers and teachers at Binghamton University.

Institute Summary
Dates

May 28-31, 2019

Cosponsors

Binghamton University Libraries

Center for Learning and Teaching, Binghamton University

Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities, Binghamton University

The Graduate School, Binghamton University

Harpur College of Art & Sciences, Binghamton University

Office of Undergraduate Education, Binghamton University

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Community Leaders

Nancy Um

Nancy Um is Professor in the Department of Art History and co-director of the Middle East and North Africa Studies Program at Binghamton University. Her research explores the Islamic world from the perspective of the coast, with a focus on material, visual, and built culture on the Arabian Peninsula and around the rims of the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean. She is the author of The Merchant Houses of Mocha: Trade and Architecture in an Indian Ocean Port (University of Washington Press, 2009) and Shipped but not Sold: Material Culture and the Social Protocols of Trade during Yemen’s Age of Coffee (University of Hawai’i Press, 2017). She recently co-edited (with Carrie Anderson), "Coordinates: Digital Mapping and 18th-C Visual, Material and Built Cultures," Journal18: a journal of eighteenth-century art and culture (Spring 2018).

Amy Gay

Amy Gay recently joined Binghamton University Libraries as their first Digital Scholarship Librarian, where she is leading the implementation of digital scholarship initiatives for the Libraries, works to help strengthen programs related to digital scholarship services, and supports and serves as a resource to faculty developing digital scholarship projects. Before coming to Binghamton University, Amy was part of the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) D.C. cohort in 2016, which is administered by the Library of Congress and funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. During this time, she managed projects at the U.S. Food & Drug Administration that focused on enabling open science, including the creation of a publicly searchable science data catalog for the Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. She received her MLIS from Syracuse University, and her research interests include primary source literacy, interactive technology and pedagogy, war history and cultural heritage preservation. In her free time, Amy enjoys attending trivia nights, hiking along the Upstate gorges, and trying out local eateries and diners.
Transcript

In May 2019, we led the Binghamton DHRI which included 17 participants: faculty members and advanced graduate students. We spent four days studying data visualization, mapping, Python, platforms for digital publishing, and engaging in lots of independent work as well. One piece of feedback that we received from our participants was that we didn't give them enough time to play with the new tools and skills that they had learned and we had put together a schedule that was very robust and very demanding. I would say everyone was exhausted by the end of the day but we wanted to really pack things in. We really had an agenda we wanted them to learn and walk away with. But then the kind of negative side of that was that they didn't have enough time to explore on their own. So if we were to do this again, we would definitely give them the opportunity to take maybe an hour a day maybe at the end of each day, maybe a little bit more, to work with the tools that they had gained exposure to, with the collaboration of their peers as well as the mentors in the room.

Collaborators

We were really fortunate to be able to bring in outside speakers and instructors. When we first started thinking about how this line-up was going to go, it was about bringing in expertise that we didn't feel was represented among our group. We had two co-organizers, each of us taught, and two graduate assistants who also taught. But we wanted to bring in for instance someone to teach text analysis, who came from Cornell, and we had someone come in to teach the command line, also from Cornell. So that was our idea first: it was about expertise. But then we realized that having these diverse voices was amazingly helpful for our participants. There were things that I think I said on the first day and maybe the second day, but when they heard it on the third day or in the afternoon of the second day from someone else, it could have been said in a different way or put differently, it really got through to them. So having this range of voices was really, really importan. So those were two of our instructors. We were also very fortunate to have two outside lectures and one of them was Lisa Rhody from CUNY and the other was Nicky Agate from Columbia. And they were really, really amazing in bringing into perspective what we were doing and why we were doing it. For instance, Lisa brought forward a whole range of digital projects that our participants had never seen—they didn't know about. They were gained exposure to them and were able to put them into context of what they were learning. And Nicky Agate came and she talked about the values of open scholarship and thinking about taking control of one's scholarly identity. Those were really really powerful ideas that I would say had never been introduced to our campus before. That was the first time I heard a talk like that on our campus. I feel like we accomplished a lot; even beyond the agenda that we had set forward for the Institute, with the help of these colleagues from other institutions.

Recruiting Sponsors

We went knocking on doors. We made sure to go to visit the stakeholders on campus in their offices and we had really interesting conversations with each of them. Just to give you a few examples, the Dean of Harpur College was one of our co-sponsors, the Dean of the Graduate School was another co-sponsor. The office of undergraduate education was also another sponsor, and the Center for learning and teaching as well as the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities. All of these different groups were interested in Digital Humanities. They knew that there were great possibilities and opportunities in the Digital Humanities. We were really able to communicate to them why one needed to bring the experience of DH to Binghamton rather than say sending our colleagues to another institution, which of course, is another possibility but why we needed to bring this experience onto our own campus and what all of us could gain from it. So we were very fortunate to have five generous co-sponsors who were also engaged and present with us. This is something that was really important: many of these co-sponsors sent representatives from their units to join us in our sessions, to sit down and learn Python with us. I think that they were able to really understand what it means to learn and teach these approaches, these tools, these issues. It turned out to be an amazingly collaborative event.

Engaging Faculty and Graduate Students

I will say, for us at Binghamton, the graduate students I think are key in any humanities initiative. And one thing that I've observed in DH in general is that the kinds of lines of mentorship don't always move in the way that we expect them to, where knowledge starts here and it goes down to students; that's just simply not the way it works. And I know that it's been very powerful on our campus, for graduate students, to begin doing computational work and then sometimes they show their advisors what they've done, and the advisor goes: "How did you do that? What is this? I've never seen this before!" And that is how then we get the faculty engaged in the digital humanities, or that's one way, and I've seen that to be a very effective way. So from the beginning, Amy and I as collaborators knew that the graduate students needed to play a really important role in this process. So one thing that we did is we were very fortunate, again, with sponsorship to hire two graduate assistants who were with us the entire four days, but also taught their own units. We also knew that we wanted to have graduate students as part of our cohort among the participants. This is interesting because some of our co-sponsors said: "Well, you know, classroom students are going to leave the institution and then then is it worth it to train them in this way? Because are they going to be able to cultivate our community?" And our answer was without question: Yes, we need to have graduate students in the room. And they were just an amazing presence in the room and I will say that I think many of my colleagues among the faculty, I don't think that they had necessarily had the experience of learning next to graduate students and also learning from graduate students. And so they got to do both during that week. And you know we started characteristically with our icebreaker, and I would say these icebreakers—some people think they're very corny. I told our participants one of the reasons we do the icebreaker is so that we can understand that these hierarchies that we often observe; that they have to be reset. And we do it through something like an icebreaker that doesn't start out, "I'm a professor" or "I'm a graduate student." We did a very silly icebreaker actually which was what really set us all on the same footing. And I thought that was really important and a great way to begin our experience.

Pedagogy

The question of pedagogical approach was one that we went back and forth on and we talked a lot with Lisa and Kalle about. And the foundational approach that we undertook at CUNY last summer was, for me, just pivotal. As someone who had been involved in DH and had done lots of workshops, lots of trainings, had had lots of exposure to different methods, I didn't know that what was stopping me was the fact that I did not have those foundations. I kept hitting these walls in terms of my research and so that, for me, was just so important and so with that knowledge we moved forward to plan our DHRI. But I will tell you we did not go entirely with the foundational approach that CUNY offered us, and we had reasons for doing so. We felt as if we wanted to combine that with what we call "out-of-the-box approach" of much more kind of tool-focus very specific outcome approach. We did both, and the reasoning behind that was that we knew that our colleagues needed to have something that was very concrete kind of tangible takeaways from that four days. By kind of toggling back-and-forth between some of these foundations, which were more abstract, and then these very tangible tools, we were able to show them that there were lots of ways to do any one thing. There was not just one single right way to engage in any task and we really emphasized versatility, but also making choices. And making choices not just because you click on this icon and your computer defaults to opening it in this program but because you understand what the possibilities are. And you're making a meaningful and substantive choice. So that turned out to be kind of the goal, the pedagogical approach that we came to, maybe accidentally, but that was something that came from that moving back and forth between these foundational concepts and then these very kind of specific tool-oriented tasks, really.

Takeaways

I would just like to say that the experience of being part of the CUNY DHRI has just been unbelievable. When I saw the DHRI advertised—that was now over a year and a half ago— I had been thinking, "This is exactly what I wanted to do on my campus!" I knew that there was something that needed to happen at Binghamton. We had been offering a workshop here, a workshop there but we never got any traction. At the same time, I would hear people, they would come to me and say, "Well, we're kind of interested in this Digital Humanities thing," and, you know, there would be all these kind of all these little kind of flickers of interest that we couldn't move forward on. And so when I saw the opportunity to do this, I just knew it was something I had to go for. And it has been amazing. It has been really amazing. It has been amazing because I had exposure to just the fantastic community here. I got to work with an amazing collaborator, Amy Gay, who is the digital scholarship librarian. I feel like our collaboration was one between a faculty member and a librarian that was really successful if I can say that at this stage—we are still kind of gauging the level of success but just working together was so fulfilling. And the kinds of exposure I had to my colleagues, in a different way. They were terrific. And they surprised me, as well, in their openness, their interest, their excitement. I would say, as well, that I've been teaching at Binghamton now for eighteen years, so a long time, the ability to bring people into a room and to realize that this group of people have never been brought into a room together for any particular reason—that's exciting, right? Because we're often looking at the same faces across the table and so we built a new community and I think that that's pretty exciting.

DHRI South Bend Indiana R1liberal arts collegeco-organized DHRIinstitutional collaborationlibraries
DHRI South Bend Indiana
R1 liberal arts college co-organized DHRI institutional collaboration libraries
The University of Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s College, with grant support from Indiana Humanities, collaborated to host a Digital Humanities Research Institute in May 2019. Using the curriculum developed by The Graduate Center, CUNY, they provided 26 participants with the opportunity to gain foundational computing skills that allowed them to advance their own digital projects, assist others in the creation and maintenance of digital research, and/or instruct others in digital methodologies.

Institute Summary
Dates

May 14-17, 2019

Cosponsors

University of Notre Dame

Saint Mary’s College

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Community Leaders

Daniel Johnson

Daniel Johnson is subject specialist for English literature and digital humanities at the University of Notre Dame's Hesburgh Libraries System. He has graduate degrees in English from Wake Forest University (MA) and Princeton University (PhD), where he specialized in literature of the long eighteenth-century.

Sarah Noonan

Sarah Noonan received her Ph.D. in medieval English literature from Washington University in St. Louis. As an Assistant Professor at Saint Mary’s College, she teaches courses in early British literature, book history, and the history of the English language. She is the author of essays on manuscript studies, medieval reading practices, devotional literature, and pedagogical practice. She is currently working on a project entitled “Peripheral Manuscripts” that seeks to assist non-R1, manuscript-holding institutions in digitizing their respective holdings and displaying them in a collective digital repository in order to increase that material’s visibility among the scholarly community.
Workshop Instructors

Amy Cavender Saint Mary's College

Ericka Christie Loyola University Chicago

Alexis Grant University of Illinois Chicago

Caroline McCraw Loyola University Chicago

Rebecca Parker Loyola University Chicago

Transcript

Together with my collaborator Sarah Noonan, we put together what we're calling DHRI South Bend because it's a collaboration with two universities right across the street from one another, it takes place four days at least in our initial incarnation in which we fairly closely match what the original CUNY syllabus was which is sort of a stepladder approach to the core technologies in digital humanities.

Professional Development

I find first of all simply taking a course of instruction—even if it's something you've haven't experience in—always illuminates new areas of inquiry and then sort of thinking as you're learning relearning the technology on the meta level about how you teach the technology I think that helped us get deeper into some of the questions because we knew we're gonna have to turn around and think strategically: Why was it successful at CUNY; how is it going to be successful locally? And that sort of leads to the other aspect of the sort of personal development professional development is so helpful about CUNY model which was the networked approach to bringing people together. Instead of just simply giving you all the answers of how to learn these technologies, you learn them together with other professionals, sort of in this nebulous field of digital humanities, but that might be coming at it from different professional backgrounds: Librarians, scholars, scholars in different disciplines. So as much as it was about learning technology, I think learning how to work together in ways that are not always intuitive or always trained for humanities people was very helpful.

Participant Feedback

I think if you receive sometimes somewhat contradictory feedback that that's going to be a sign that you may be doing the right thing. One of one of the threads that we heard was: "this is going a little bit fast," and on the other side we heard "could we have a little bit more of this, I have some of these foundations, can we have more challenges?" I think one of the big challenges that we faced was pairing people, not only with the different disciplinary backgrounds that we've talked about but different experience levels. But I think that's also a sign of success because as you looked around at the tables, you saw people helping out one another, learning together, trying to figure out things as they went. So even though some people might have had the foundations, and knew already what they were doing a little bit, they were able to help those who otherwise might have started to get a little bit behind because you can't stop an entire class, the forward momentum necessarily because one or two people are having trouble, but if you're able to work together in community at your tables, you can keep going, catch back up, and leverage the strength of the community. I think those pacing questions were also matched up with responses that reseed, which said: Yes, I am certainly feeling supported and getting the help I need. The results on that were very clear and high. So if you get some of that contradictory result but also sort of that positive reaction to how things are going, how the help is going, I think that's a sign you're doing the right thing. That's sort of what we strove for.

Collaborators

My collaborator Sarah Noonan and I come from different-sized institutions. Her's is St. Mary's, it's a liberal arts college. Notre Dame is an R1, research-heavy sort of college but both are looking to emphasize interdisciplinary study—if I understand correctly—and DH is a great place for this kind of engagement and so we wanted to expose our participants to that diversity of participants, and where they're at whether they're students—we did have one undergraduate student—graduate students who are looking to start research projects but faculty members who might be looking to integrate DH more into teaching and pedagogy, which again, in turn, if your graduate student you might end up in a more teaching heavy-type of institution. So I think that that sort of diversity of background in multiple aspects was something that we wanted to expose people to, that's very compatible with DH. And then we started to think beyond the local to the regional context as we actually applied for grants. We received very generous funding from Indiana Humanities to support what we were doing. That got us thinking: there are a lot of places that could benefit from this type of program that don't have people dedicated to digital humanities, for example. Got us thinking a little more strategically about using the DHRI as a way to build up partnerships for these institutions, which again included everything from R1 down to liberal arts institutions. One common thread that we saw moving through there was: we want to start a digital humanities program of some kind or expand it. We don't really have much support for it locally. So we saw this as another opportunity to keep expanding networks beyond just the two campuses but to campuses throughout the region of varying sizes and emphases.

Pedagogy

We've really tried not to reinvent the wheel on this in that we wanted to put into practice the things that we learned at the DHRI which built on one another. Here's command line, here's git and GitHub. Now you're gonna use that the next day to start building out the advanced sessions. So we took that ethos and said: OK, let's fork the curriculum, see what that looks like. Let's start to make edits. That actually got us thinking about what is a relationship of our forked curriculums to the original, which I don't think we've actually sorted out yet. But but we did want to use that forked curriculum as a basis for what we're doing because there's been a lot of work and a lot of experience that has gone into that. So we took that and turned the keys over to our graduate student teachers. We did have, I should say, one faculty teacher from St. Mary's, which was great. And let them put their own spin on the curriculum and we're gonna rethink a few things. This did expose interesting questions of: Oh, there's a personal story and an "I" voice in this particular module. What is my relationship to that? Do I need to change and adjust this? Or is this intrinsic to the curriculum? So we really did take what we think was a successful training program. As I hinted, it does sort of scaffold on itself and we wanted to preserve that scaffolding as much as possible. So we adhered pretty closely to the CUNY syllabus and we hope to develop some new modules based on that same ethos next year.

Digital Humanities Afrofuturism Workshop Mississippi museumsarchives
Digital Humanities Afrofuturism Workshop Mississippi
museums archives
The Digital Humanities Afrofuturism Workshop was designed to provide an intensive, community-oriented, and foundational approach to learning technical skills in service of historically African American institutions and affiliated organizations focused on the care, collection, and preservation of Black culture. Advancing digital learning, alliance-building, and resource sharing through highly interactive discussions with leading Digital Humanities scholars and practitioners in Digital Humanities was at the center of the Institute.

Institute Summary
Dates

Aug 6-7, 2019

New/Edited Workshops

What is a Digital Humanist? An Afro-futurist Viewpoint of Digital Humanities Preparing to Launch Your Digitization Project Technology for Community Impact The Revolution Will Be Digitized Funding Futurism Project Advisement Sessions

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Community Leader

Marion McGee

Marion “Missy” McGee is a servant leader who believes in creative problem solving through the embrace of failure, experimentation and innovation. Marion is on the Association of African American Museums (AAAM) Board of Directors where she chairs the Communications Committee. She also serves as a Museum Program Specialist in the Office of Strategic Partnerships at the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). She is responsible for the design, implementation and evaluation of key collaborative initiatives, multi-state programs for the only national museum congressionally mandated to strengthen and elevate the profile of African American museums, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and other institutions promoting the study or appreciation of African American history and African diaspora cultural heritage in the United States. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Leadership and Change to investigate methods of preserving the leadership legacy of Black Museum Movement pioneers. As a scholar-practitioner, Marion is working to identify best practices for advancing, growing and sustaining organizations founded by or on behalf of persons of African descent. Her areas of expertise include long-term strategic planning and prudent financial management through participatory leadership.
Transcript

Our Institute was held at the 41st Annual Association of African American Museums Conference which was held in Jackson Mississippi and we did it as a pre-conference workshop over a two-day period. Those two days were to allow conference attendees to come in early to receive this intensive training in Digital Humanities with an afrofuturism feel. So we infuse the workshop in the training with afrofuturism, with scholars, people who are leading practitioners in afrofuturism and whose projects are informed by their afrofuturist viewpoint. What that essentially means is that we have a participant base that is made up of African American museums, libraries, cultural institutions, archives, a number of historically black colleges and universities, and professionals who are working to preserve histories within their communities. But they're also looking for ways to connect those histories to present and future generations. And so afrofuturism gives them the opportunity to infuse like a cool factor and to make it much more dynamic and informed by the the facts of the past but also how those facts help us to shape or even reshape or reimagine the future that we'd like to see. That gave it an increased interest and that has made for a really growing engagement of professionals or practitioners across disciplines who otherwise I don't think ever would have connected or be collaborators within this network once they have seen how much their shared interest and their passions actually do align.

Partners and Collaborators

I reached out first to colleagues within my institution. Within the museum, I knew of two people in particular that would be receptive to this discussion. One was Dr. Doretha Williams and she leads our Robert Frederick Smith African American Digitization Initiative. That's an initiative where they go out and lead community-curation projects. They take this huge bus and go around the country, basically digitizing people's family collections; family photos, memorabilia, anything that would allow people to preserve their own family histories. I met with her and Laura Coyle. Dr. Laura Coyle is the Director of our Digitization and Collections department and she and Doretha just opened up generously with any number of people that they thought would be interested in this. We put our heads together and started thinking through how these two days could be shaped. I shared with them my DHRI curriculum from last summer and they really, really understood what we were trying to achieve. Literally, for every week that passed, they were doing email introductions of colleagues around the country. For every person I talked with that they referred me to, that person referred me to several others. So we ended up with people from all over, everywhere from University of Central Florida to Michigan State to University of California Riverside. I mean, we have scholars coming from Canada, scholars coming from Senegal, West Africa. It's really, really just fascinating how collaborating really just took the form of asking—asking for help. As soon as we asked, people were more than generous to say: "I'm doing this, but you should also talk to this person," and people that they were genuinely interested in their work.

Challenges

Oh wow, major challenges throughout the process. The main challenge was time, the time constraint and knowing that you only have a certain amount of time both to plan the institute but also the offering of it. I ideally wanted to replicate the experience I had and it became clear with me connecting it to a larger annual conference there was no way I could have even three full days. So I ended up trimming my my three-day plan down to two full days which then became one and a half day and really trying to be mindful that we wanted this to be the start of a larger conversation, the start of an opportunity to grow this community of learners so it didn't all have to be covered this first year. Once I started to understand that we don't have to do everything the first go-around, that this truly is a pilot where we will see how many people attend, we would see how they respond and that would give us I think the information that would that would be useful in planning the next one. So it really has been just learning how to to maximize the time that we have together and not really focus so much on the constraints of the time. That was my major challenge. The other part of it was communicating when I felt overwhelmed. The same collaborators that I had gone to initially, to say: "What do you think? How should we approach this? Who do you know in this field?" They were the same people that I could go back and say: "Oh my gosh, it was a month ago that we talked and I meant to email you a month ago. Can we can we just talk?" And having that ability to say "I'm sorry, things are moving so fast. If you'll give me another week or so," and they would say "Don't worry about it. What can I do to help? How can I reach out for you? Can I take something off your list?" That has been a tremendous learning experience for me but also a tremendous help in overcoming the challenge of feeling the pressure of trying to make it all come together and realizing that none of us do this by ourselves. It may be my responsibility to make sure it gets accomplished but I don't get there alone. There's a whole group of us working on this.

Takeaways

I think my larger take-away both last year and through this process of planning my own Institute is: the truth is you do not have to be an expert. You really have enough help and enough support and the collaboration and the ability to partner, the ability to share and spread the love and the load around, building a team not just for the planning and coordination but just having people you can bounce ideas off of. You don't have to know it all and that was the biggest reassurance I had leaving here last year was after the training feeling like, "Oh, I didn't realize that I do know some things," or "I can do this," and that I can learn as I go and then coming into the space of needing to then coordinate a similar experience for another group of people that I don't have to be the expert. I don't have to even facilitate the entire thing. I can utilize and lean on those who have expertise in certain areas and really lean into my own strengths, and that being connecting dots and making sure people have an experience that's unforgettable. That was really the biggest takeaway: whatever you have, you can contribute. Whatever you have will add value and you don't need to know it all in order to to accomplish what you want to accomplish.

Africana DHi 2019 Arizona public R1online
Africana DHi 2019 Arizona
public R1 online
Africana DHi was offered as a three week online workshop between May and June 2019 in association with the Center for Digital Humanities at the University of Arizona. The Africana DHi centered the question: How do we define and implement digital Africana Studies demonstrative of the unique black context for digital usage? Studies in the digital humanities often assume and/or reinforce certain universal frameworks and biases. However, Black cultural practices demonstrate unique epistemologies regarding the digital. Recently, scholars have written extensively on digital hush harbors, Black Twitter, and hashtag activism like #MuteRKelly, #BlackLivesMatter, #SayHerName. During this Institute, participants explored interdisciplinary, digital humanities research and teaching with DH scholars, developed core computational research skills through online workshops, and began developing their own digital humanities projects. When participants completed the workshop, they were invited to share their reflections in a publication of the Spring 2020 Special Issue of Fire!!!, the peer-reviewed digital journal for the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH).

Institute Summary
Dates

May 28-Jun 11, 2019

Cosponsors

The Center for Digital Humanities at the University of Arizona

Africana Studies at the University of Arizona

More information
Community Leader

Erika Gault

Erika Gault is an Assistant Professor of Africana Studies at the University of Arizona. Erika Gault’s scholarly work focuses on the intersection of religious history, technology, and urban black life in post-industrial America.On the topic of hip hop, religion, and digital ethnography she has delivered and published a number of papers regionally, nationally, and internationally. She is an ordained elder at Elim Christian Fellowship in Buffalo, NY and an award winning slam poet. She is currently working on her first book project titled Being Christian, Doin' Hip Hop: A Digital Ethnography of Black Millennial Christianity and a co-edited volume entitled You Gon' Learn Today: The Aesthetics of Christians in Hip Hop.
Transcript

Africana DHi, Africana Digital Humanities Institute ran from May 28th to June 11th. It was all online, we had 15 participants from four countries, four continents, a diverse offering of digital humanities tools. As well, we talked about bibliographic information that consists of new Africana works as well as foundational what works for thinking about digital humanities from an Africana perspective.

Digital Humanities

So one of the things that I think is unique to our institution is its focus on digital humanities. So we have a few scholars who have been doing this work for a number of years, like a lot of institutions, Africana-centered approaches to digital humanities is sometimes work that's being done in isolation. We have the benefit that folks have been thinking about this for a little while at our institution so we have the Center for Digital Humanities. Putting on an institute like this one really fit into the goals and missions of both the center as well as the Africana Studies program as we begin to think about expanding to an MA or even a master certificate program in Digital Humanities work that has an Africana Center.

Participant Feedback

Specifically for those that are participating that are either people of color and so their experiences are very much informed by their history in the U.S. or globally, or for people who are doing this work on folks of African descent—with that work comes a certain passion for the voices of people on the margins being heard. So, this institute was not only about learning new tools but also finding out how you can connect with those communities, maintain the kind of passion that you have and bring that to the academic work that you do. Reaching those audiences in order to do that, it will be very important to speak to those kinds of concerns that communities of colors have.

Participant Recruitment

The whole wide internet was really helpful in a couple of ways. For our Institute I reached out to a number of colleagues who I knew were doing similar projects or they maybe had not talked about using digital tools but I thought it could help some of the work that they were doing. And then I just talked with a lot of friends and colleagues who were in Africana Studies or doing Africana-centered work and asked them to talk to their networks or to consider being a part of the Institute as well The Association of Internet Researchers was actually very helpful and I think that's really what gave us a boost in attracting international participants.

Challenges

I guess I had two major challenges: one going in and one that presented itself once we began. Going in, my biggest challenge was: Am I qualified to do this kind of work? When I looked at the applicants, they had a diverse set of skills and some of them could be counted as experts in their field. But I was able to, in some way, quiet my fears by keeping in mind that they assigned on to this Institute for particular reasons— some of them because they wanted to start an Institute similar to it, because there are very few resources even if you are an expert in a certain area, it's very important to reach out. And also thinking about this as a collaborative project, I was not there to know everything or to have all of the answers. But it really forced me to think collaboratively about how we build out the Institute. And then the other challenge: I hadn't anticipated it being such an international audience. And we wanted to make sure the Institute was accessible to everyone, so we definitely didn't want to turn anyone away because they were outside of the of the U.S. especially given the kind of goals that we have for the Institute overall. So we accepted international as well as U.S. participants. That became a challenge in terms of balancing time zones, figuring out which apps or platforms to use in order to make sure we were using the right GMT. We were all over the place in terms of timezone so navigating that became a challenge but it also became a teachable moment.

Takeaways

People have to know that DHRI is a wonderful institution in terms of the support that they offer for scholars beyond their own institution to continue to build collaborations that go far beyond your own time within their Institute.

Digital Humanities Research Institute at University of Louisville Kentucky public R1
Digital Humanities Research Institute at University of Louisville Kentucky
public R1
University of Louisville's Digital Humanities Research Institute was offered as a two-day residential workshop in the digital humanities. This event provided a space for a diverse set of scholars interested in the digital humanities to practice core skills in storymapping, GIS, machine learning, and NLTK. No prior knowledge was assumed—the goal was not to master but to experience the tools, and to then participate in inventive and capacious discussions that imagine how such a tool might be put to use in the contexts of research, teaching, and service.

Institute Summary
Dates

May 8-9, 2019

More information
Community Leader

Frances McDonald

Frances McDonald is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Louisville where she works on critical theory and twentieth-century American literature and film. Her current book project examines the textual forms that laughter takes in twentieth-century literature and philosophy. Her work has appeared in American Literature, LA Review of Books, and The Atlantic, among other venues. She is also the co-editor and co-designer of thresholds, an occasional digital zine for creative/critical scholarship.
Transcript

Our DHRI took place over two days in May. We had 15 participants from four institutions that were all local. Part of the project of the DHRI was to do that kind of bridging work. We had a structured morning with workshops and an unstructured, roundtable discussion-based afternoon.

Pedagogy

Also, it was important in building the DHRI of my institution to balance out a more structured workshop environment with a playful, experimental, inventive space where participants could engage in lively, speculative conversations about how a tool might be used in their own field. It was based in the fact that for me personally at the DHR I here in New York last year some of the best and most generative moments for me were in those moments at dinners or in breaks. I wanted to create a space for that at my Institute and in the feedback that I received from participants, it was in those in those spaces that some of the most productive work was done as is so often the case in academia more generally.

Challenges

I think a major challenge that we faced at our institution was trying to legitimize the work that we were doing there as digital humanities work. Particularly those unstructured conversations, people weren't necessarily sure going in what they were getting out of the Institute. There was an assumption I think that they would—despite my emails—that they would gain some kind of mastery of a tool, which of course isn't possible in a short workshop in one day. So a challenge for me was finding a way to frame what we were doing as productive work. I think that we achieved that through those unstructured discussions, actually. Because it was there that people were doing collaborative, cross-disciplinary work. Which are sort of buzzwords in the digital humanities—collaboration and interdisciplinary—but so much of that happens through conversation and dialogue. I think never underestimate the power of putting people in the same room physically. And also the old adage: if you build it they will come. We have had this dedicated DH space for a while and not much has happened in it, so it was a very important thing for us to hold an event there, to have it be well attended, and to have it as something that we can repeat as a model.

Digital Technologies Conference Minnesota private liberal arts college
Digital Technologies Conference Minnesota
private liberal arts college
This Digital Humanities Research Institute was organized as the first ever Digital Technologies in the Humanities and Social Sciences Conference at the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University. The objectives of the conference were two-fold: (1) to share with interested faculty, staff, and students valuable resources on digital research and learning from the Digital Humanities Research Institute at The Graduate Center, CUNY in June 2018; (2) to create a space for faculty, staff and students to share their experiences working with digital technologies, as well as share insights on how to apply these technologies to enhance teaching excellence.

Institute Summary
Dates

May 28, 2019

Cosponsors

Clemens and Alcuin Libraries, College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University

Instructional Technology, Clemens and Alcuin Libraries, College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University

Academic Affairs, Clemens and Alcuin Libraries, College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University

New/Edited Workshops

Python Open Education Resources Digital Publishing HMML Bright Global Futures Podcasts Digital Artifacts/Museums Advanced Canvas Finding, Using, and Citing Images Analyzing US Trade Patterns

Community Leader

Sophia Geng

Growing up in Shandong, China, Dr. Sophia Geng obtained her MA from Beijing Foreign Studies University and her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, U.S.A. Dr. Geng’s academic interests lie in oral history, the safeguarding of cultural heritage and East Asian literature. Joining the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University (CSB/SJU) in 2007, Dr. Geng currently is an Associate Professor at the Department of Languages and Cultures. She also served as the Director of the Asian Studies Program from 2013 to 2017. CSB/SJU are two top-ranked liberal arts colleges in Minnesota, U.S.A., that share an integrated academic partnership. With a combined enrollment of 4,000 students, CSB/SJU are the largest liberal arts colleges in the U.S.
Transcript

Our Institute happened May 29th. It was a one day Institute, but there was a lot of content. We decided that it had to be one day because we have a four full-day workshop right before it. So this is really the fifth day. In the future when we do this again, there's the possibility to make it map multiple days.

Participant Feedback

We had a takeaway session at the end of the day and the feedback, it's just overwhelmingly positive: We had 55 participants, that's pretty amazing, and then it was a very good mixture of faculty members, staff, students, and some community members. So we opened the call of participation to really everybody. We tried to make it inclusive and then the people, they are so positive. They think they learned a lot. This is really useful for their personal professional development, for teaching excellence, and they saw the examples of what they could do with this in terms of their own research. We invited people both in the humanities and social sciences and natural senses to say what they have done. Even at a liberal arts college, the product that you could produce is really top-notch, so this is very encouraging. I think that suggests the interest: they want this to be continued, you know: What will be the second one? When would that happen? And then we have to think about the sustainability of this and we then have to think about the the structure. How to make this really part of the of the agenda as we move forward to prepare for the next stage of humanities studies?

Challenges

I think the major challenges are: you had to find the people that you can work with: your peers, your supporters, your collaborators. And sometimes that takes time, sometimes, if there are twists on the way— but you want to make sure you have a core group of people that are with you on this. I have been lucky because from very early on the director of the libraries at my institution is a very devoted supporter for this. She thinks there's a real need in the community because a previous survey, especially in terms of pedagogy. So she wrote a letter for me to apply for the Research Institute back in 2017. And then when I told her I want to bring this back to our campus, she was very supportive. I also have another director, the director in charge of the instructional technology, she has been with me since the planning stage. Miranda—that's her name—I think we two are really kind of the driving force and people who really completed all the logistics of the conference.

Recruiting Participants

We have a Mellon grant at CSB/SJU that really focus on how to make the community more inclusive for all the members. When we were trying to plan this first ever digital technologies conference at CSB/SJU we really wanted to be inclusive and welcome to all the community members. We send out multiple, multiple emails to everybody that we could think of. And when we sent the tentative schedule with all the topics, we were very open for suggestions. We sent out a survey for people to be able to add and give people space for them to make choices, such as a popular one: What's the incentive gift that you want to get when you come to this technology conference? We decided on a flash drive. So I think this really helped. And also we understand, it's kind of a demanding schedule that we designed, because there are so many people who want to really contribute to the conference. We had basically more presenters than we could handle. Then what we decided to do is group the presenters and themes. We have the digital possibilities for people to tell us what they're already doing in their classrooms and in their research field. And then we have the digital pedagogy panel that almost everybody can benefit from. And we have four undergraduate students who decided to join. And we shared a lot about why this is fascinating for them: Why they want digital technologies in general in the classrooms. So that's just beautiful.

Pedagogy

I think we wanted it to be really conversational so there's a lot of space and a place that we left in the agenda for people to feel free to ask questions and we have break sessions where people can talk with the neighbors in small groups, we have interactive sessions where people can really have dialogues to talk about where they want to go from here. So it is built in through the day.

Takeaways

I think this is something that faculty members can really do. We think of how busy our schedules are: Do we need another thing? Do we need to learn all these digital tools? What's the benefits for us? I'm really in the middle of everything: the middle of my life, mid-career, and I'm a mother. I have to be responsible for many, many things. I have administrative duties as well. But this is also a time for me to think what the world of humanities studies will be 20-30 years from now and how I, as a faculty member, can remain relevant and really a value-contributing member for the community. I think this is really the route to go. And this is doable, with help from our young and fresh and so knowledgeable Digital Fellows, and very kind support from peers, we can really do this. I picked up digital skills that I thought was impossible. When people showed me the great work they do, I think: How could I do that? Then when I really do it and put it up I think, "Oh, that's pretty amazing as well." So, you know, give it a try!

Tri-Co DHRI Pennsylvania institutional collaborationliberal arts college
Tri-Co DHRI Pennsylvania
institutional collaboration liberal arts college
The Digital Scholarship Research Institute was a two-day intensive institute for Tri-Co faculty to explore interdisciplinary digital scholarship research and teaching methods through hands-on workshops and guided practices. Faculty new to digital scholarship and those interested in taking their skills to the next level were invited to participate. Participants gained experience with fundamental digital scholarship tools and methods including navigating their computers via the command line, cleaning messy data, practicing version control, and sharing their work publicly, while also learning about local digital scholarship communities and support.

Institute Summary
Dates

May 6-7, 2019

Cosponsors

Bryn Mawr College’s LITS

Haverford College Libraries

Swarthmore Libraries

Participants

8, from disciplines:

  • History
  • History of Art
  • Linguistics
  • Spanish
  • Modern Languages
  • Literatures/Arabic
  • Anthropology
  • Growth and Structure of Cities
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    Community Leader

    Alicia Peaker

    Alicia Peaker (PhD, Northeastern University) is the Digital Scholarship Specialist at Bryn Mawr College. Previously, she completed a CLIR/DLF Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Digital Liberal Arts at Middlebury College. While in graduate school, she served as the Co-Director of Our Marathon: The Boston Bombing Digital Archive, which won an award as the Best DH Project for Public Audiences in 2013. She has also worked as the Project Manager for The Women Writers Project and as the Managing Editor for GradHacker, a collaborative blog published through Inside Higher Ed. Her current research project explores ways of visualizing the botanical worlds of novels.
    Evangelical Seminary of Puerto Rico DHRI Puerto Rico multi-denominational theological college
    Evangelical Seminary of Puerto Rico DHRI Puerto Rico
    multi-denominational theological college
    Institute Summary
    Community Leader

    Rosín Torres

    Rosín Torres-Medina is a Professional Librarian at Juan De Valdes Library of the Evangelical Seminary of Puerto Rico (SEPR) after graduating from the University of Puerto Rico. Her Master's capstone project explored open journals system technology. She has attended continued education workshops in transdisciplinary research, editing scientific journals in electronic format, and technology for online education. She is mostly passionate in collaborating and promoting learning of library resources such as the OPAC, the databases, Mendeley reference manager, digital tools and skills among faculty and students. She is engaged in promoting collaboration and open access projects at the library and regularly participate in workshops and courses around the latest research techniques and enhancement of research and writing skills. Academically, she is interested in Digital Humanities, in the areas of Bible and religion. Her career revolves around technology, as she loves to inspire change as a means for challenge and opportunities. The capacity of libraries to help people achieve their common and academic goals has always been an interest of hers.
    Triangle Digital Humanities Institute North Carolina public R1
    Triangle Digital Humanities Institute North Carolina
    public R1
    The three-day event Triangle Digital Humanities Institute aimed to help practitioners build digital skills, share work, and meet new collaborators. TDHI invited anyone interested in the digital humanities community, including academics, cultural heritage specialists, civic hackers, and others to participate in two days of skill-building workshops followed by a day-long unconference. Participants could register for one, two, or all three days.

    Institute Summary
    Dates

    May 22-24, 2019

    Twitter hashtag
    New/Edited Workshops

    Twitter Analytics in the Humanities Classroom Historical Maps in GIS Beginner Python Leaflet Maps Tropy for Archival Research AR and VR Advanced Beginner Python Developing websites with VR for use in the classroom Teaching with Scalar Mobile Storytelling Tenable Media Projects Free Tools to Introduce Undergraduates to DH

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    Community Leader

    Nathan Kelber

    Nathan Kelber is the Digital Scholarship Specialist at the University Libraries, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He comes from Detroit where he worked as a professor, public historian, and community organizer. Kelber is most well-known for his work on Detroit 67, a citywide campaign to commemorate the 1967 Detroit Uprising and encourage racial harmony, as well as his other project Network Detroit, a regional digital humanities conference. At UNC, Kelber helps faculty and graduate students with digital projects and serves as a library point of contact for local digital humanities communities and initiatives.

    Image above by Ildar Sagdejev at English Wikipedia, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license. Cropped.

    Digital Humanities (Graduate Course) Georgia private R2historically black colleges and universities
    Digital Humanities (Graduate Course) Georgia
    private R2 historically black colleges and universities
    The Clark Atlanta University's Digital Humanities Research Institute was ran as a graduate course titled Digital Humanities by the Humanities PhD program in the Fall 2018 semester. This course centered around the Cascade Oral History project, which provided students with training in digital archiving, metadata creation, video editing, web development, and GIS mapping. The DH Oral History project demonstrates how partnerships between municipalities, non-profit organizations, and higher education institutions can foster cooperation and promote intergenerational dialogue within communities that experience rapid demographic changes.

    Institute Summary
    Dates

    Sep 15-Dec 15, 2018

    Community Leader

    Rico Chapman

    Dr. Rico D. Chapman received his PhD in African Studies from Howard University. He is currently an Associate Professor of History at Clark Atlanta University. He also serves as Assistant Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and Director of the Humanities PhD program. His most recent book is titled Student Resistance to Apartheid at the University of Fort Hare: Freedom Now, A Degree Tomorrow (Lexington, 2016).

    Image above by Hildabast at English Wikipedia, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license. Cropped.

    Digital Humanities Research Institute at Southern Methodist University Texas private R2
    Digital Humanities Research Institute at Southern Methodist University Texas
    private R2
    DHRI at SMU was a pilot program that worked towards building and sustaining an active community around the shared idea of Digital Humanities and Digital Scholarship. The goal for DHRI@SMU was to create an intensive, community-oriented, and foundational approach to learning technical skills in service of humanities teaching and learning.

    Institute Summary
    Dates

    Aug 19-22, 2019

    More information
    Community Leader

    Rafia Mirza

    Rafia Mirza is a Humanities Research Librarian at SMU. She received her MSI from the University of Michigan. Her research interests include digital humanities, digital project planning, and issues around labor and community in digital humanities and digital pedagogy.

    Image above by Jeffrey Beall at English Wikipedia, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. Cropped.

    DHRI@A-State Arkansas public R2
    DHRI@A-State Arkansas
    public R2
    DHRI@A-State was a three-day workshop, hosted by the Arkansas State University Faculty Center. During the institute, participants explored digital humanities research and pedagogy, developed computational skills through hands-on workshops, and began designing their own digital humanities projects for research or teaching.

    Institute Summary
    Dates

    Mar 29-31, 2019

    More information
    Community Leader

    Andrea Davis

    Andrea Davis is Assistant Professor of Modern European and Digital History at Arkansas State University. Her research examines the urban social movements and memory cultures of twentieth century Spain, and has been supported by the the Fulbright Foundation and the University of California Humanities Network, among others. In addition to her position at the university, Andrea currently serves as the Associate Director of the Spanish Civil War Memory Project: Audiovisual Archive of the Francoist Repression and the book review editor of the Bulletin for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies.
    Wayne State University DHRI Michigan public R1
    Wayne State University DHRI Michigan
    public R1
    Wayne State University Library's DHRI emphasized that digital humanities methods has become increasingly important in scholarly research, classroom teaching, and also provide transferrable technology skills to students in all disciplines. Additionally, cultural heritage professionals can learn how to extend collections and understand the needs of researchers using collections for digital humanities work. Wayne State University's DHRI aimed at supporting this work on campus and in the greater Detroit metro area, and invited all interested to a free, 4-day series of training workshops. The course was taught by WSU Librarians and SIS faculty, and was based on the curriculum developed by the Digital Initiatives at The Graduate Center, CUNY. The DHRI provided basic training in areas of digital humanities computing that humanists interested in digital work are likely to encounter. The course was offered to build a resilient community of DH practitioners who can turn to one another for networking and support, to familiarize participants with basic DH methods they might be hesitant to explore on their own (answering "where do I start?" questions), and to empower humanists, librarians, graduate and undergraduate students, and cultural heritage professionals to conduct DH work in southeast Michigan. Participants were challenged and worked hard to build community with others creating digital work, and came away with new knowledge and skills to move their project on to the next step.

    Institute Summary
    Dates

    Jul 16-19, 2019

    Twitter hashtag
    More information
    Community Leader

    Alexandra Sarkozy

    Alexandra Sarkozy is a science and digital scholarship librarian at Wayne State University in Detroit, MI. She has been working with faculty and librarians to incorporate digital tools into humanities classrooms, and to build digital infrastructure for humanities computing within the library. She is a also a graduate student in American History at Wayne State University. Her research interests include history of medicine, historical mapping, and data sharing and preservation.

    Image above by Del arte at English Wikipedia, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. Cropped.

    The DHRI Team


    Lisa Rhody

    Project Director, DHRI and Deputy Director of Digital Initiatives at The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    As Director of Digital Fellowship Programs, she leads 3 cohorts of graduate students: the GC Digital Fellows, Program Social Media Fellows, and Videography Fellows who work to extend and improve the critical use of digital technologies in research and teaching. Lisa is on the faculties of the M.A. in Liberal Studies, M.A. in Digital Humanities, and M.S. in Data Analytics and Visualization programs, and serves as Director of Research Projects for the CUNY Academic Commons, an academic social network designed to support faculty initiatives and build community through the use of technology in teaching and learning. Previously, she was Associate Director of Research Projects at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media. Lisa holds a Ph.D in English from the University of Maryland, College Park. Her research, which uses computational methods such as text mining and machine learning to explore 21st century poetry, has appeared in the Journal of Digital Humanities, Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016, and PMLA.



    Matthew K. Gold

    Associate Professor of English and Digital Humanities and Advisor to the Provost for Digital Initiatives, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Matthew K. Gold holds teaching appointments in the Ph.D. Program in English, the M.A. Program in Liberal Studies, and the doctoral certificate programs in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy and American Studies. He serves as Advisor to the Provost for Digital Initiatives, Director of the CUNY Academic Commons, Director of the GC Digital Scholarship Lab, and Director of the M.A. Program in Digital Humanities and the M.S. Program in Data Analysis and Visualization. He edited Debates in the Digital Humanities (Minnesota, 2012) and, with Lauren F. Klein (with whom he is co-editor of the Debates in the Digital Humanities book series), recently co-edited Debates in the Digital Humanities 2016 (Minnesota). His collaborative digital humanities projects include Manifold Scholarship (with Doug Armato), Looking for Whitman, Commons In A Box, Social Paper (with Erin Glass), and DH Box (with Stephen Zweibel). He is Vice President/President-Elect of the Association for Computers and the Humanities.



    Kalle Westerling

    Project Coordinator, DHRI and Ph.D. Candidate, Theatre and Performance, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Kalle Westerling is completing a dissertation on the history and aesthetics of male-identified dancers in 20th-century burlesque and 21st-century boylesque. He is also an Instructional Technology Fellow at Macaulay Honors College and Queens College, where he assists faculty and students to link technology and learning in a technology-across-the-curriculum initiative.



    Stephen Zweibel

    Digital Scholarship Librarian, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Stephen Zweibel supports digital project creation by GC researchers across the disciplines, helps preserve those projects, and supports faculty and students with their data-based research and data management needs. He also coordinates the library’s growing series of workshops on research skills and tools. Steve earned his master’s degree in library and information science from Long Island University in 2010, and received a master’s degree in the Digital Humanities track of the GC’s MALS program. As a MALS student, he built DH Box, a cloud-based computer lab for digital humanities research (including the tools Omeka, NLTK, IPython, R Studio, and Mallet). DH Box won a National Endowment for the Humanities Start-Up grant. Before coming to the Graduate Center, Steve was a visiting lecturer at Hunter College, where he built several useful library tools, including Augur, a web application to track reference question data; a mobile app for the CUNY library catalog; and Know Thy Shelf, a radio frequency identification (RFID)-based library inventory system.



    Jojo Karlin

    Digital Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, English, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Jojo Karlin researches transmissions of memory after periods of rapid technological transformation. Coming from a theater background, Jojo loves the intersection of disciplines, multiple media, and diverse expertises she finds in Digital Humanities. For her first big DH project, she did outreach for TANDEM, a web tool that gathers text and image data, and she now proudly coordinates outreach for DH Box, the GC's NEH-funded DH cloud laboratory. She is a freelance editor for the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia, and is developing a digital interface for a collection of historical letters. Jojo is deeply interested in digital editions preserving past materiality while exploring new materials.



    Patrick Smyth

    Research Computing Coordinator, Columbia University and Ph.D. Candidate, English as well as former Digital Fellow, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Patrick Smyth's research focuses on Utopian thought and the history of science in 18th and 19th century British literature. As a digital humanist, Patrick is concerned with digital platforms for research and pedagogy. He is currently a developer on the NEH-funded DH Box, a cloud-based platform for accessing digital humanities tools, and has received a Provost's Digital Innovation grant for an online archive of science fiction works. His most recent publication is “Ebooks and the Digital Paratext: Emerging Trends in the Interpretation of Digital Media” in Examining Paratextual Theory and Its Applications in Digital Culture. Patrick was a 2010 Fulbright Teaching Fellow in Berlin, Germany, and teaches composition and literature at Queens College.



    Olivia Ildefonso

    Digital Fellow and Ph.D. Student, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Olivia Ildefonso is a Ph.D. Student in Earth and Environmental Sciences with a specialization in Human Geography at the Graduate Center (CUNY). She studies the political economy of school segregation. Her research focuses on Long Island, New York. Olivia is a Long Island native and has worked as a racial justice activist on Long Island for the past ten years. She has worked for civil rights organization, ERASE Racism since 2010 and she has served on the board of directors for STRONG Youth since 2013. Olivia is currently a GC Digital Fellow. She specializes in GIS Mapping, website management, and multi-media storytelling. Before becoming a GC Digital Fellow, Olivia was an Adjunct Lecturer at Queens College and a Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) fellow at John Jay College.



    Javier Otero Peña

    Digital Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, Environmental Psychology, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Javier Otero Peña is a GC Digital Fellow since 2016 and a member of the Public Space Research Group, and currently works as a research assistant for the PARCS study in the CUNY School for Public Health. His dissertation will study the contextual impacts of park renovations in New York City, and will involve a map analysis using GIS technologies, a mini-ethnography using Qualitative Data Analysis (QDA) software, and natural language analysis of social media posts. Javier’s field research paper studied the politicization of public spaces through a participatory mural in East Harlem. In 2016, he took part in the CUNY-Humboldt University Summer School in Berlin, and in 2017 he participated in the Digital Humanities Research Institute in Victoria University, Canada. He also received the 2017 Provost’s Digital Innovation Grant. Javier holds a Master in Environmental Policies and Sustainable Development, and taught a class on Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean at the Paris Catholic University. He also studied Urban Planning and Management at UCV, and Sustainable Urban Mobility in Developing Countries (UNITAR). Javier worked as a consultant for the United Nations Environment Programme for three years.



    Kristen Hackett

    Digital Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, Environmental Psychology, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Kristen Hackett is a scholar, activist and educator living and working in New York City. She is a Ph.D. Candidate in Environmental Psychology Program at the Graduate Center of the City of New York, a Digital Fellow with the GC Digital Scholarship Lab, a Digital Pedagogy Fellow with the OpenLab at City Tech, a Coordinator of OpenCUNY, and a member of the Executive Committee of the Justice For All Coalition. Her research interests are in housing and community development in NYC, political and social responses to increasing insecurity and precarity and how art and technology can be used in consciousness-raising and resistance efforts and to advocate for community/human-centered policy development. For her dissertation, Kristen is exploring these themes through the lens a proposed rezoning in Long Island City, NY.



    Filipa Calado

    Digital Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, English

    Filipa Calado is a Ph.D. student in the English program at the Graduate Center. She focuses on queer modernist literature, theories of cognition and aesthetics, and digital methodologies. Currently, she is interested in conversations about digital methods and hermeneutics, especially those that engage affect and feeling within a queer context. She is also interested in histories of composition and experimental writing by queer authors, and in the digitization and transcription of print artifacts. As an English instructor, she incorporates social reading practices, particularly digital annotation, to teach close reading. Most recently, she uses and develops annotation tools that engage affect and feeling as part of larger critical interventions in the classroom.



    Stefano Morello

    Digital Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, English

    Stefano Morello is a Ph.D. candidate in English. He holds an M.A. in American Literature from the University of Naples "L'Orientale” and an M.A. in American Studies from the University of Torino. His academic interests include American Studies, pop culture, poetics, queer theory, and transnational screen cultures. Oh, and punk-rock.



    Rafael Davis Portela

    Digital Fellow and Ph.D. Student, History, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Rafael Davis Portela is a Ph.D. student in the History department, where he researches the role of transnational capital in the urban development in Latin America. He is also a member of the Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies–CLACLS, and Adjunct Professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, where he teaches courses on Latin American History. He is also into digital tools, and interested in anything related to teaching.



    Tom Ribitzky

    Coordinator, Graduate Center Digital Initiatives


    Luke Waltzer

    Director, Teaching and Learning Center, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Luke Waltzer is the Director of the Teaching and Learning Center at the CUNY Graduate Center, where he supports GC students in their teaching across the CUNY system and beyond, and works on a variety of pedagogy and digital projects. He previously was the director for the Center for Teaching and Learning at Baruch College. He holds a Ph.D. in History from the CUNY Graduate Center, serves as a Community Advisor to the CUNY Academic Commons and on the editorial collective of the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, and has contributed essays to Matthew K. Gold's Debates in the Digital Humanities and, with Thomas Harbison, to Jack Dougherty and Kristen Nawrotzki's Writing History in the Digital Age.



    Katina Rogers

    Director, Programs and Administration, The Futures Initiative, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Katina Rogers is the Director of Administration and Programs of the Futures Initiative and HASTAC at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Rogers' work focuses on many aspects of higher education reform, including scholarly communication practices, professionalization and career development, public scholarship, and advocacy for fair labor policies. She previously worked with the Modern Language Association as managing editor of MLA Commons, the MLA’s online platform for collaboration, discussion, and new modes of scholarly publishing. Her study on perceptions of career preparedness, which she conducted as senior research specialist for the Scholarly Communication Institute, provided valuable data on the skillsets and career paths of humanities graduate students. While at SCI, she contributed to the development of the Praxis Network, a multi-institutional and international effort geared toward sharing model programs and experiments in humanities methodological training. Katina is the editor of #Alt-Academy, a digital publication dedicated to exploring the career paths of humanities scholars in and around the academy. She holds a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Colorado at Boulder.



    Jill Cirasella

    Associate Librarian for Public Services and Scholarly Communication at The Graduate Center, CUNY

    Jill Cirasella is Associate Professor and Associate Librarian for Public Services and Scholarly Communication at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. In this position, she oversees reference, instruction, outreach, circulation, interlibrary loan, thesis/dissertation services, and scholarly communication initiatives. A vocal advocate of open access (OA), Jill spurred the creation of the CUNY Academic Works repository, and she continues to promote understanding of OA at CUNY and beyond. Her research also centers on OA, including the anxieties surrounding OA dissertations, and she serves on the boards of three OA journals, including the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication.



    Amy Gay

    Community Leader and Mentor

    Amy Gay recently joined Binghamton University Libraries as their first Digital Scholarship Librarian, where she is leading the implementation of digital scholarship initiatives for the Libraries, works to help strengthen programs related to digital scholarship services, and supports and serves as a resource to faculty developing digital scholarship projects. Before coming to Binghamton University, Amy was part of the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) D.C. cohort in 2016, which is administered by the Library of Congress and funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. During this time, she managed projects at the U.S. Food & Drug Administration that focused on enabling open science, including the creation of a publicly searchable science data catalog for the Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. She received her MLIS from Syracuse University, and her research interests include primary source literacy, interactive technology and pedagogy, war history and cultural heritage preservation. In her free time, Amy enjoys attending trivia nights, hiking along the Upstate gorges, and trying out local eateries and diners.



    Sarah Noonan

    Community Leader and Mentor

    Sarah Noonan received her Ph.D. in medieval English literature from Washington University in St. Louis. As an Assistant Professor at Saint Mary’s College, she teaches courses in early British literature, book history, and the history of the English language. She is the author of essays on manuscript studies, medieval reading practices, devotional literature, and pedagogical practice. She is currently working on a project entitled “Peripheral Manuscripts” that seeks to assist non-R1, manuscript-holding institutions in digitizing their respective holdings and displaying them in a collective digital repository in order to increase that material’s visibility among the scholarly community.



    Rico Chapman

    Community Leader and Mentor

    Dr. Rico D. Chapman received his Ph.D. in African Studies from Howard University. He is currently an Associate Professor of History at Clark Atlanta University. He also serves as Assistant Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and Director of the Humanities Ph.D. program. His most recent book is titled Student Resistance to Apartheid at the University of Fort Hare: Freedom Now, A Degree Tomorrow (Lexington, 2016).



    Erika Gault

    Community Leader and Mentor

    Erika Gault is an Assistant Professor of Africana Studies at the University of Arizona. Erika Gault’s scholarly work focuses on the intersection of religious history, technology, and urban black life in post-industrial America.On the topic of hip hop, religion, and digital ethnography she has delivered and published a number of papers regionally, nationally, and internationally. She is an ordained elder at Elim Christian Fellowship in Buffalo, NY and an award winning slam poet. She is currently working on her first book project titled Being Christian, Doin' Hip Hop: A Digital Ethnography of Black Millennial Christianity and a co-edited volume entitled You Gon' Learn Today: The Aesthetics of Christians in Hip Hop.



    Daniel Johnson

    Community Leader and Mentor

    Daniel Johnson is subject specialist for English literature and digital humanities at the University of Notre Dame's Hesburgh Libraries System. He has graduate degrees in English from Wake Forest University (M.A.) and Princeton University (Ph.D.), where he specialized in literature of the long eighteenth-century.



    Dianne Fallon

    Community Leader and Mentor

    Dr. Dianne Fallon is the English Department Chair at York County Community College. Currently, she is involved with integrating more digital tools into English and Humanities classes, both to stimulate interest in humanities subjects and to boost student confidence in using digital technologies. At York County Community College, Dianne teaches a variety of writing courses, including College Composition, Creative Writing and Creative Non-Fiction, as well as Humanities courses such as Multicultural America. In spring 2019, she will teach a new course, "Witches and War, on the Web", in which students will investigate the connection between the Salem Witch trials and Abenaki-colonial warfare in Maine, and will develop their own local history research and digital presentation projects.



    Patrick Sweeney

    Former Digital Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, Psychology, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Patrick Sweeney was a Ph.D. Candidate in Psychology and a Digital Fellow at the Graduate Center, CUNY, while working on the DHRI team. His dissertation traces the historical development of methods for quantifying human experience in psychology, business, and politics; and shows how their entwined histories animate current controversies surrounding the use of personal digital data in research, propaganda, and marketing. He has published on topics including the ethics of social media data in psychological research, media representations of social identities and urban change after trauma, and the theory and praxis of ethics and methods pedagogy. His work as a GC Digital Fellow has focused on workshop development, ethics in digital research, and supporting social media and web tools. He has previously taught at Hunter College, CUNY, and served as a Writing Across the Curriculum fellow at Kingsborough Community College, CUNY.



    Rachel Rakov

    Former Digital Fellow and Ph.D. in Linguistics

    Rachel Rakov was a doctoral student in the Linguistics Department, with a focus in Computational Linguistics, when she worked on the DHRI team. Her dissertation research is on using prosody modeling to train computational models that can distinguishing between native and non-native English questions. She has also worked on building tools for automatic language identification, and tools for automatic detection of sarcastic speech. She has presented her research at Interspeech and ASRU. In addition, Rachel has helped develop and teach courses in Python programming and Natural Language Processing for the Computational Linguistics M.A. program at The Graduate Center. She was also a consultant on O\'Reilly book Introduction to Machine Learning, where she provided input on how to make the content of the book more accessible to readers without a math or CS background. Rachel has been an intern with the Speech-Language Technology team at Interactions, and taught at Hunter College.



    Hannah Aizenman

    Digital Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, Computer Science, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Hannah Aizenman was a doctoral student in Computer Science and a Digital Fellow at the Graduate Center, CUNY, while working on the DHRI team. Her research is in using machine learning to make sense of and visualize multivariate spatio-temporal, mostly climate, datasets and the algorithms run on them. At the City College of New York, she taught multiple variants of introduction to programming a and piloted peer led team learning for the Computer Science department. She also teaches data science using Python and mentors high school stunds for the CREST HIRES earth science and remote sensing REU at CCNY. She is an organizer of the New York City Linux User's Group, is on the planning committee for the American Meteorology Society's Python Symposium, and a core contributor to the matplotlib Python visualization library.



    Kelsey Chatlosh

    Digital Fellow and Ph.D. Candidate, Anthropology, The Graduate Center (CUNY)

    Kelsey Chatlosh is a cultural anthropology Ph.D. student and Digital Fellow at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). Her future dissertation research focuses on Afro-Chilean activism for state recognition, territory and alternative discourses of memory and history, and how they are contesting dominant narratives of Chilean history and nationhood. Her work as a Digital Fellow is focused on digital tools and platforms for qualitative research and oral interviews, with an emphasis on ethics, political economy and decolonizing and feminist methods.



    Nicky Agate

    Assistant Director of Scholarly Communication and Projects, Columbia University Libraries

    Nicky Agate is the assistant director of scholarly communication and projects at Columbia University, where she leads a team that works on digital humanities initiatives, digital publishing, and the institutional repository. Until February of this year, she was head of digital initiatives at the MLA, where she was responsible for Humanities Commons (hcommons.org), MLA Commons (mla.hcommons.org), and CORE (hcommons.org/core). She is a co-PI on the HuMetricsHSS initiative (medium.com/tag/humetrics), which seeks to establish a framework for values-based assessment and evaluation in the humanities and social sciences and a founding editor of The Idealis, an overlay journal that promotes quality open-access scholarship about scholarly communications issues (theidealis.org). She serves on the research committee of the Library Publishing Coalition and the editorial board of the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication (jlsc-pub.org). Nicky holds a Ph.D. in French Literature from NYU and an M.F.A. in Literary Translation from the University of Iowa.



    Patricia Hswe

    Program Officer, Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

    Patricia Hswe is the program officer for Scholarly Communications at the Foundation, which she joined in August 2016. In this role she works on a range of grants and initiatives supporting libraries, archives, museums, universities, presses, and other institutions that further the world's collective knowledge of the humanities. Previously, Patricia was digital content strategist and co-department head of Publishing and Curation Services at the Penn State University Libraries and, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, program manager for several digital preservation projects funded by the Library of Congress. Originally a Russian literature scholar, she holds a Ph.D. from Yale University in Slavic languages and literatures. She also received an A.B. in Russian language and literature from Mount Holyoke College and an M.S. in library and information science from the University of Illinois. Patricia is currently a member of the Executive Council of the Association for Computers and the Humanities.



    Kelly Baker Josephs

    Associate Professor of English at York College, CUNY

    Kelly Baker Josephs is Associate Professor of English at York College, City University of New York. She specializes in Caribbean literature, with forays into the digital humanities and women's studies. Her book, Disturbers of the Peace: Representations of Insanity in Anglophone Caribbean Literature (University of Virginia Press, 2013), considers the ubiquity of madmen and madwomen in Caribbean literature between 1959 and 1980. She is the editor of sx salon: a small axe literary platform (smallaxe.net/sxsalon), manages The Caribbean Commons website (caribbean.commons.gc.cuny.edu), and co-organizes the annual Caribbean Digital conference (caribbeandigitalnyc.net). Her current book project, Caribbean Articulations: Storytelling in a Digital Age, explores the intersections between new technologies and Caribbean cultural production.



    Shana Kimball

    Managing Director of Research, Data & Society

    Shana brings ten years of experience working in higher ed / research settings as an academic publisher, project and people manager, strategist, communicator, and public speaker on open access, alternative academic careers, and more. Most recently, at NYPL Labs, she led the development of a new initiative to engage technologists, scholars, and other digital practitioners in new uses of the Library’s digital collections and data sources, and to host conversations and incubate experimental projects that explore the future of public knowledge.



    Michelle McSweeney

    Postdoctoral Fellow at Columbia University’s Center for Spatial Research

    Michelle A. McSweeney is a Research Scholar in the Center for Spatial Research at Columbia University. She is the author of The Pragmatics of Texting: Making Meaning in Messages (Routledge 2018), and co-host of the podcast Subtext (subtextpod.github.io). Her research focuses on digital writing in romantic relationships, particularly how we establish intimacy and trust through text messaging. She uses Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning techniques to identify key features that distinguish romantic from platonic conversations. Recently, she has expanded her research to investigate how politically polarized media outlets discuss politically charged topics such as gun control and immigration, and the linguistic strategies they use to build trust with their audiences. She received her Ph.D. in Linguistics and a certificate in Interactive Technology and Pedagogy from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in 2016.



    Julia Miele Rodas

    Professor of English at Bronx Community College, CUNY

    Julia Miele Rodas is Professor of English, teaching writing, literature, and disability studies at Bronx Community College. She holds a Ph.D. in English from the CUNY Graduate Center. A disability studies scholar and Victorianist, Julia is co-editor of a collection on disability in Jane Eyre (The Madwoman and the Blindman, The Ohio State University Press, 2012) and co-edit​​or of the Literary Disability Studies book series for Palgrave Macmillan. Her writing has appeared in numerous books and journals, including Victorian Literature & Culture, Dickens Studies Annual, the Victorian Review, the Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies, Disability Studies Quarterly. Her monograph, Autistic Disturbances, is forthcoming from University of Michigan Press.